Etymology

ymology

From the time of its start until the approach of World War II, it was called simply the World War or the Great War and thereafter the First World War or World War I.

In Canada, Maclean’s Magazine in October 1914 said, “Some wars name themselves. This is the Great War.” During the Interwar period (1918–1939), the war was most often called the World War and the Great War in English-speaking countries.

The term “First World War” was first used in September 1914 by the German philosopher Ernst Haeckel, who claimed that “there is no doubt that the course and character of the feared ‘European War’ … will become the first world war in the full sense of the word.” After the onset of the Second World War in 1939, the terms World War I or the First World War became standard, with British and Canadian historians favouring the First World War, and Americans World War I.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *